Join the Conversation: November Edition

When you were 18, what did you imagine your future would look like? How close does your life today come to that vision?

Fear.  Certainty. Uncertainty. Excitement.  Expectations.  Assumptions.  This is us at 18.  We took certain things for granted, not knowing how to get there.  We feared a lot of things that we would survive.  We wanted to be grown up without having a clear idea of what that meant. Continue reading

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In the shelter of others

In case you missed it, there’s a new feature here at Mother Sugar called, The Salon: What You Know For Sure. Every month we’ll be asking a new question and inviting all of you to respond. Big or small, long or short, send us your memories and we’ll share ours. Today’s post draws on this month’s theme:

When you were 18, what did you imagine your future would look like? How close does your life today come to that vision?

This post started though before we decided to invite you for tea and cake in the Salon. Continue reading

Oh la la! An indulgent post about my love affair with France

I was in advanced French in high school, a very green sixteen, when I told my French teacher I was going to live in Paris one day.  She looked down her square rimmed glasses and asked why.  Because I love … Continue reading

The Boxes Under the Stairs

This weekend found me sitting in my mother’s basement, sorting through a gaggle of boxes that had sat undisturbed for almost twenty years in a tiny room under the stairs. My mother is thinking of moving and so it was finally time for my sister and I, on a trip home for a family event, to sift through the paraphernalia we’d successfully avoided until last Sunday. Continue reading

First Kiss (A Reprieve from the Angst)…

There’s a not-so recent NY Times article which has sat uncomfortably with me for a while.  It posits that while we generation X-ers are famously sarcastic, conflicted, inherently resentful of our self-obsessed boomer parents and dismissive of sentimentalism; we are also faced with an existential challenge:  how do we look back on the good old days without betraying our “reality bites” outlook? Continue reading